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[The thirty-seven nats] 9. Shwé Nawrathá nat. 10. Aungzwámagyí nat.

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Names
Temple, Richard Carnac, Sir, 1850-1931 (Writer of accompanying material)
Griggs, William, 1832-1911 (Printer of plates)
Collection

thirty-seven nats, a phase of spirit-worship prevailing in Burma, by Sir R. C. Temple. With full-page and other illustrations.

Dates / Origin
Date Issued: 1906
Place Term: London
Publisher: W. Griggs, chromo-lithographer to the king.
Library locations
General Research Division
Shelf locator: *OY+ (Temple, R.C. Thirty-seven nats) (Locked Cage)
Topics
Religion -- Burma
Daggers & swords -- Burma
Balls (Sporting goods) -- Burma
Thrones
Chisels & mallets
Genres
Illustrations
Notes
Content: No. 9. Shwé Nawrathá Nat. He was the son of Mingbyaing Màthíríthú and grandson of the second Mingaung of Ava. During the reign of his uncle, Shwé Nàngyaw, one of his servants, Nga Thaukkyá, rebelled. On this account, Shwé Nawrathà was thrown into the Irrawaddy and became a Nat. This Nat is represented in high class Court dress, seated on a lotus throne, as a Manipúrí, with polo mallet and ball. The modern English game of polo came from the Manipúrís through English officers in quite recent times. [p.59] No. 10. Aungzwámagyí Nat. One Nga Saung-gyàn raised a rebellion at Ngasingú, about six miles to the north of Mandalay, against Min Narathéngá, king of Pagán, and the king sent his younger brother, Narabadísíthú, against him, in the hope that his brother might be killed, so that he might marry his widow, i.e., his sister-in-law, the Wálúwadí Princess. So Narabadísíthú left his servant, Nga Aungzwá, behind, with a promise that if he could kill the king, he should be married to the widow. The king was duly despatched, and Nga Aungzwá demanded fulfilment of his promise, but the lady flatly refused to marry him, as he was not of the blood royal. When Nga Aungzwá was told of this, he spat on the flor, and used some strong language about the fulfilment of promises. The new king, being enraged at this, had him put to death, whereon he became a Nat. This Nat, who is very popular, is represented as a young man in high class Court costume, with a sword in the right hand, riding quietly. [p.61]
Physical Description
Form: Chromolithographs ( Library of Congress Thesaurus for Graphic Materials )
Extent: Two images on one 37.5 x 26.5 cm page. (Coloured)
Type of Resource
Still image
Identifiers
NYPL catalog ID (B-number) : b11610752
UUID: 9617c110-c6df-012f-dc30-3c075448cc4b

Item timeline of events

  • 1850: Creator Born
  • 1906: Issued
  • 1931: Creator Died
  • 2014: Digitized
  • 2015: Found by you!
  • 2016

MLA Format

General Research Division, The New York Public Library. "[The thirty-seven nats] 9. Shwé Nawrathá nat. 10. Aungzwámagyí nat." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1906. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-a896-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Chicago/Turabian Format

General Research Division, The New York Public Library. "[The thirty-seven nats] 9. Shwé Nawrathá nat. 10. Aungzwámagyí nat." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 6, 2015. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-a896-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

APA Format

General Research Division, The New York Public Library. (1906). [The thirty-seven nats] 9. Shwé Nawrathá nat. 10. Aungzwámagyí nat. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-a896-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Wikipedia Citation

<ref name=NYPL>{{cite web | url=http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-a896-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99 | title= (still image) [The thirty-seven nats] 9. Shwé Nawrathá nat. 10. Aungzwámagyí nat., (1906) }} |author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=July 6, 2015 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox, and Tilden Foundation}}</ref>

[The thirty-seven nats] 9. Shwé Nawrathá nat.  10. Aungzwámagyí nat.