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A priest of Asklepios (Aesculapius) and a patient calling up the sacred, non-poisonous snakes.

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1624842
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Names
Forestier, A. (Amédée) (d. 1930) (Artist)
Caton, Richard (1842-1926) (Originator)
Collection

Wonders: Images of the Ancient World

Religion -- Ancient -- Greece

Dates / Origin
Date Issued: 1906-03-10
Library locations
Art and Picture Collection
Topics
Greece -- Religion
Incense
Sacrifices
Greek temples
Altars
Greeks -- To 499
Priests -- Greece -- To 499
Tripods -- Greece
Snakes -- Greece -- To 499
Temples -- Greece
Interiors -- Greece -- To 499
Notes
Content : Printed on border: "Drawn by A. Forestier from restorations by Dr. Richard Caton." "During the recent excavations of the Health Temple of Asklepios at Cos, the scene of Hippocrates' labours, a curious cist with a heavy marble lid was discovered. This is believed to have been the place where the priests kept the sacred snakes of Asklepios. In the center of the slab is a hole (see photograph on another page) through which the snakes went out and in. This Ophiseion, or place of the snakes, was let into the floor of a small sanctuary in which an altar of incense is supposed to have stood. There the priests brought their patients to sacrifice, and to offer sacred cakes to the serpents. On the walls were probably engraved health maxims and votive inscriptions of persons who had been cured."

Source identifier: Iln (Hades Legacy Identifier / Struc ID)
Physical Description
Form: Halftone photomechanical prints ( Library of Congress Thesaurus for Graphic Materials )
Note: Tears on image.Condition
Extent: 1 print : b ; sheet 35.5 x 24.5 cm.
Type of Resource
Still image
Type of Resource
Still image
Identifiers
UUID: 942ee3f0-c5bf-012f-1f70-58d385a7bc34

Item timeline of events

  • 1906: Issued
  • 2013: Digitized
  • 2015: Found by you!
  • 2016

MLA Format

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "A priest of Asklepios (Aesculapius) and a patient calling up the sacred, non-poisonous snakes." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1906-03-10. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e4-5f80-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Chicago/Turabian Format

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "A priest of Asklepios (Aesculapius) and a patient calling up the sacred, non-poisonous snakes." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 1, 2015. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e4-5f80-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

APA Format

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. (1906-03-10). A priest of Asklepios (Aesculapius) and a patient calling up the sacred, non-poisonous snakes. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e4-5f80-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Wikipedia Citation

<ref name=NYPL>{{cite web | url=http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e4-5f80-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99 | title= (still image) A priest of Asklepios (Aesculapius) and a patient calling up the sacred, non-poisonous snakes., (1906-03-10) }} |author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=July 1, 2015 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox, and Tilden Foundation}}</ref>

A priest of Asklepios (Aesculapius) and a patient calling up the sacred, non-poisonous snakes.