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The introduction of Hercules and the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, in Eleusinian mysteries.

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1624641

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Title
The introduction of Hercules and the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, in Eleusinian mysteries.
Names
Desnoyers, Auguste Gaspard Louis (1779-1857) (Lithographer)
Housselin, Alexis Louis Pierre (Engraver)
Collection

Wonders: Images of the Ancient World

Mythology (General)

Dates / Origin
Date Issued: 1844 - 1861
Library locations
Art and Picture Collection
Shelf locator: PC-WON MYT
Topics
Serpents -- Mythology
Ceres (Roman deity)
Hercules (Roman mythology)
Persephone (Greek deity)
Diana (Roman deity)
Hairstyles -- Greece -- To 499
Torches -- To 499
Triptolemus (Greek mythology)
Greeks -- Clothing & dress -- To 499
Dioscuri (Greek mythology)
Eleusinian mysteries
Hecate (Greek deity)
Genres
Lithographs
Notes
Content: The "Dioscuri" are the twins Castor and Pollux, symbolized in the constellation Gemini. The Eleusinian mysteries were the teachings of a secret society which stressed morals and ethics. Ceres was the Roman counterpart of the Greek Demeter, a goddess of agriculture and the harvest. Proserpine (Persephone to the Greeks), the daughter of Demeter, was a goddess of grains and of the underworld. Triptolemus was a "culture hero" who taught mankind the arts of agriculture. His "dragons" in this picture are rather small and look like large snakes. Hecate was a triple goddess of the moon, the earth and the underworld. Diana (her Roman name, to the Greeks she was Artemis) was the goddess of the moon and of the hunt.
Content: The name "Toussaint" is listed as one of two lithographers credited below the image at lower left.
Content: Written below image: "The introduction of Hercules and the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, in Eleusinian mysteries. In the center Ceres stands holding a burning torch, Proserpine sits facing Triptolemus seated in his winged chariot drawn by two dragons. Hecate is at left and Diana at right, both with burning torches. Castor gives Diana his hand and he is characterized by the star. Pollux faces his brother and below him is Hercules. All three are crowned with myrtle and carry elaborate torches. The temple is indicated by the six Doric columns. The articles at Ceres' feet are instruments of weaving and of embroidery. Pourtales Collection."
Source note: Elite des monuments céramographiques : matériaux pour l''histoire des religions et des moeurs de l''antiquité. (Paris : Leleux, 1844-1861) Lenormant, Charles (1802-1859), Author.
Physical Description
Extent: 1 print : b ; 34 x 48 cm.
Type of Resource
Still image
Identifiers
Universal Unique Identifier (UUID): 91e4e070-c5be-012f-ac4d-58d385a7bc34
Rights Statement
The New York Public Library is interested in learning more about items you've seen on our websites or elsewhere online. If you have any more information about an item or its copyright status, we want to hear from you. Please contact DigitalCollections@nypl.org with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

Item timeline of events

  • 1779: Creator Born
  • 1844: Issued (Approximate)
  • 1857: Creator Died
  • 2013: Digitized
  • 2016: Found by you!
  • 2017

MLA Format

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "The introduction of Hercules and the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, in Eleusinian mysteries." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1844 - 1861. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e4-5fee-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Chicago/Turabian Format

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "The introduction of Hercules and the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, in Eleusinian mysteries." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 24, 2016. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e4-5fee-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

APA Format

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. (1844 - 1861). The introduction of Hercules and the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, in Eleusinian mysteries. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e4-5fee-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Wikipedia Citation

<ref name=NYPL>{{cite web | url=http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e4-5fee-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99 | title= (still image) The introduction of Hercules and the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, in Eleusinian mysteries., (1844 - 1861) }} |author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=July 24, 2016 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox, and Tilden Foundation}}</ref>

The introduction of Hercules and the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, in Eleusinian mysteries.