The story of Negro dance in America

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The story of Negro dance in America

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Title
The story of Negro dance in America
Names
Terry, Walter (Speaker)
Connecticut College American Dance Festival (Associated name)
Collection

Dance Audio Archive

Dates / Origin
Date Created: 1963-08-14
Library locations
Jerome Robbins Dance Division
Shelf locator: *MGZTO 7-676
Topics
Lane, William Henry, approximately 1825-1852
Rice, Tom, 1808-1860
Dunham, Katherine
Primus, Pearl
Baker, Josephine, 1906-1975
Terry, Walter -- lectures
Cakewalk (Choreographic work : Boris)
Fjernt fra Danmark; eller Et Costumebal ombord (Choreographic work : Bournonville)
Amors og Balletmesterens Luner (Choreographic work : Galeotti)
African American dance
Minstrel shows
Tap dancing
Genres
Lectures
Notes
Funding: The processing and cataloging of this recording was made possible in part by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. The support of the National Endowment for the Arts is also gratefully acknowledged.
Content: Title supplied by cataloger based on the typewritten title on the original container of the original recording.
Venue: Recorded at the Connecticut College School of the Dance August 14, 1963 New London (Conn.)
Physical Description
Audiotape reel
Extent: 1 audiotape reel (approximately 49 min.); full-track; 3.75 ips; 7 in
The sound quality is good overall.
Description
Streaming audio file (approximately 49 minutes). [Begins abruptly.] Walter Terry speaks about the stereotyped traditional image of the black man; famous black dancers and white black face dancers of the 19th century such as William Henry Lane (known as Juba), Daddy Rice, and Master Diamond; tap dancing; the adaptation of the traditional cakewalk in Ruthanna Boris' Cakewalk; black revues of 1895-1910; black face dancers in two Danish ballets, August Bournonville's Fjernt fra Danmark, and Vincenzo Galeotti's Amors og Balletmesterens Luner; Katherine Dunham; Pearl Primus; inter-racial dance companies; Josephine Baker; black and inter-racial musical comedies; black tap dancers; some of the many black modern and ballet dancers active today; the difficulty of determining what should be preserved from the past and what should be discarded [applause and gap followed by Terry's final remarks].
Type of Resource
Sound recording
Languages
English
Identifiers
RLIN/OCLC: 43744368
NYPL catalog ID (B-number): b12117250
Universal Unique Identifier (UUID): f9535300-f4cc-0136-5a6c-65529d775a1c
Rights Statement
The copyright and related rights status of this item has been reviewed by The New York Public Library, but we were unable to make a conclusive determination as to the copyright status of the item. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use.

Item timeline of events

  • 1963: Created
  • 2019: Digitized
  • 2019: Found by you!
  • 2020

MLA Format

Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library. "The story of Negro dance in America" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1963. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/146d6160-3ba6-0134-fec0-60f81dd2b63c

Chicago/Turabian Format

Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library. "The story of Negro dance in America" New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed September 21, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/146d6160-3ba6-0134-fec0-60f81dd2b63c

APA Format

Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library. (1963). The story of Negro dance in America Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/146d6160-3ba6-0134-fec0-60f81dd2b63c

Wikipedia Citation

<ref name=NYPL>{{cite web | url=http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/146d6160-3ba6-0134-fec0-60f81dd2b63c | title= (sound recording) The story of Negro dance in America, (1963) }} |author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=September 21, 2019 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox, and Tilden Foundation}}</ref>

The story of Negro dance in America