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Jug Ging, Tamzhing Phala Choethpa, 2nd Day [Close shot]

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Jug Ging, Tamzhing Phala Choethpa, 2nd Day [Close shot]

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Title
Jug Ging, Tamzhing Phala Choethpa, 2nd Day [Close shot]
Additional title: Dance of the Ging with Batons (Peling Tradition)
Additional title: Peling
Names
Core of Culture (Organization) (Producer)
Core of Culture (Organization) (Donor)
Collection

Bhutan Dance Project, Core of Culture

Dates / Origin
Date Created: 2005
Library locations
Jerome Robbins Dance Division
Shelf locator: *MGZIDF 702B
Topics
Dance -- Bhutan
Folk dancing -- Bhutan
Dance -- Religious aspects -- Buddhism
Rites & ceremonies -- Bhutan
Masks -- Bhutan
Festivals -- Bhutan
Dzongs -- Bhutan -- Bumthang (District)
Bumthang (Bhutan : District)
Genres
Filmed dance
Filmed performances
Notes
Biographical/historical: Tamzhing Phala Choethpa means the Tamzhing Festival of the Boar or Pig. Five kms drive from the Jakar town lies the Tamshing Lungrub Chholing which means the Temple of the Good message. In 1501 Pema Lingpa established it and now is the most important Nyingma goemba in the Kingdom. It is believed that Pema Lingpa had built the goemba with the assistance from Khandroma (female celestial deities/angels). Inside there are original images painted by Pema Lingpa. On the east side of the inner court lies a small lhakhang called as Dunkur Lhakhang. The lhakhang has an unusual design with the main chapel in the center of the assemble hall, almost like a separate building. In the front lies three thrones for the three incarnations (body, mind & speech) of Terton Pema Lingpa.
Content: Tamzhing Phala Choethpa Festival (Sept. 13, 2005: Day Two): Atsara Cham - Dance of the Atsaras ; Lang Zam - Bull-headed Zam Dance ; Phag Cham - Dance of the Boar ; Peling Jug Ging - Dance of the Ging with Batons (Monks) ; Peling Dri Ging - Dance of the Ging with Swords (Monks) ; Peling Nga Cham - Peling Drum Dance (Laymen) ; Guru Tshengye - Eight Mainifestations of Guru Rinpoche.
Venue: Videotaped in performance at the Tamzhing Lhakhang/Monastery (danc apron of main courtyard, corner looking across arena diagonal at the dancers' entrance, Tamzhing Gonpa), in Bumthang, on Sept. 13, 2005.
Acquisition: Gift; Core of Culture. NN-PD
Physical Description
Born digital
Extent: 1 video file (33 min.) : sound, color
Description
Monks version with the first day the Jug-Ging and Dri-Ging are performed by the Monks and these are followed by the Peasants' Ngacham - the opposite order to the one on Day 2.The Peling Ging-Sum (the three dances of the Ging in the Pema Lingpa tradition) are three dances that are performed around the country in a particular sequence. The Ging-Sum comprises three dances: Jug Ging, Dri Ging and Nga Ging which show the forces of good in direct combat with evil spirits who plague living beings with their constant suasions to commit wrong. Jug means baton or wand and the Jug Ging are spirits tasked to search out the presence of evil (using their wands as sensitive instruments to find out the direction in which evil lies). The Dri Ging - who carry swords - subjugate evil with their weapons before punishing and slaying (with compassion) any such evil spirits found. The Nga-ging - who each carry a drum - perform a victory dance at having overcome the evil spirits, and also ensure that even those conquered evil spirits are still prayed for and ultimately liberated from their evil ways. These three dances are considered to have been reveled by Terton Pema Lingpa in the 16th Century - and they are thus known as ter-cham or (revealed) treasure dances. They express a coherent choreographic and dramatic intention on the great Saint's part. They are most often performed together with nyulemai cham (Dance of the Evil Spirit) which serves as an active and visible reference to the existence of evil in the world - and the nyulema is often captured and dispatched by the Jug bearing Ging of the first of these dances.Tamzhing Phala Choethpa is held for three days each year from the 10-12th day of 8th Bhutanese month. A Chamjug or rehearsal day is held on the 9th day of the Lunar Month.
Type of Resource
Moving image
Identifiers
NYPL catalog ID (B-number): b19780373
Universal Unique Identifier (UUID): 6ce308e0-8292-0130-c17e-3c075448cc4b
Copyright Notice
Core of Culture
Rights Statement
This item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

Item timeline of events

  • 2005: Created
  • 2013: Digitized
  • 2020: Found by you!
  • 2021

MLA Format

Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library. "Jug Ging" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 2005. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/6d065c80-8292-0130-5531-3c075448cc4b

Chicago/Turabian Format

Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library. "Jug Ging" New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed March 28, 2020. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/6d065c80-8292-0130-5531-3c075448cc4b

APA Format

Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library. (2005). Jug Ging Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/6d065c80-8292-0130-5531-3c075448cc4b

Wikipedia Citation

<ref name=NYPL>{{cite web | url=http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/6d065c80-8292-0130-5531-3c075448cc4b | title= (moving image) Jug Ging, (2005)|author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=March 28, 2020 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations}}</ref>

Jug Ging