Observations intended to favour a supposition that the black color (as it is called) of the Negroes is derived from the leprosy

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Title
Observations intended to favour a supposition that the black color (as it is called) of the Negroes is derived from the leprosy
Names
Rush, Benjamin, 1745-1813 (Author)
Collection

Sidney Lapidus Slavery and Abolition Collection

Dates / Origin
Date Created: 1760 - 1813
Library locations
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division
Shelf locator: Sc Rare E 15-10 (Lapidus Collection)
Topics
Slavery
Slave trade
African Americans
Blacks
Enslaved people
Black race -- Color
Black race -- Diseases
Leprosy
Genres
Essays
Notes
Bibliographic history: This paper appeared in the American Philosophical Society Transactions Volume 4, pps. 289-297.
Physical Description
Extent: 28 cm.
Description
This essay was originally read, July 14, 1792 by Dr. Rush at a meeting of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery and the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage. In it, Rush attributes the skin color of Africans to the effects of leprosy. He argues that a cure should be sought for the Africans who suffered from this disease. Curing the disease, Rush states, would eliminate any argument in favor of enslaving Africans based upon their skin color. Further, Rush argues it would make them happier and strengthen the claim that all people are descended from one original couple.
Type of Resource
Text
Languages
English
Identifiers
RLIN/OCLC: 558795436
NYPL catalog ID (B-number): b20856894
Universal Unique Identifier (UUID): 4bedf700-ed26-0133-b49e-00505686a51c
Rights Statement
The New York Public Library believes that this item is in the public domain under the laws of the United States, but did not make a determination as to its copyright status under the copyright laws of other countries. This item may not be in the public domain under the laws of other countries. Though not required, if you want to credit us as the source, please use the following statement, "From The New York Public Library," and provide a link back to the item on our Digital Collections site. Doing so helps us track how our collection is used and helps justify freely releasing even more content in the future.

Item timeline of events

  • 1745: Creator Born
  • 1760: Created (Approximate)
  • 1813: Creator Died
  • 2016: Digitized
  • 2019: Found by you!
  • 2020

MLA Format

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, The New York Public Library. "Observations intended to favour a supposition that the black color (as it is called) of the Negroes is derived from the leprosy" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1760 - 1813. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/ac54c7c0-1628-0134-e13b-00505686a51c

Chicago/Turabian Format

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, The New York Public Library. "Observations intended to favour a supposition that the black color (as it is called) of the Negroes is derived from the leprosy" New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed June 24, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/ac54c7c0-1628-0134-e13b-00505686a51c

APA Format

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, The New York Public Library. (1760 - 1813). Observations intended to favour a supposition that the black color (as it is called) of the Negroes is derived from the leprosy Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/ac54c7c0-1628-0134-e13b-00505686a51c

Wikipedia Citation

<ref name=NYPL>{{cite web | url=http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/ac54c7c0-1628-0134-e13b-00505686a51c | title= (text) Observations intended to favour a supposition that the black color (as it is called) of the Negroes is derived from the leprosy, (1760 - 1813) }} |author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=June 24, 2019 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox, and Tilden Foundation}}</ref>

Observations intended to favour a supposition that the black color (as it is called) of the Negroes is derived from the leprosy