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The entry of the Red Army into the Ukrainian and White Russian districts of Poland gave England and her allies an unpleasant surprise and left her "Ministry of Lies" unable to do anything but issue angry statements. Our picture shows a German army commander with Russian officers in the former Voivodeschaft (district) of Bialystok during discussions concerning the placement of the agreed (German-Russian) demarcation line.

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3965710

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Title
The entry of the Red Army into the Ukrainian and White Russian districts of Poland gave England and her allies an unpleasant surprise and left her "Ministry of Lies" unable to do anything but issue angry statements. Our picture shows a German army commander with Russian officers in the former Voivodeschaft (district) of Bialystok during discussions concerning the placement of the agreed (German-Russian) demarcation line.
Names
Hoffmann, Heinrich, 1885-1957 (Photographer)
Collection

Eye on the Reich : German propaganda photographs, 1939-1942

1939

Dates / Origin
Date Issued: 1939
Library locations
The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Picture Collection
Shelf locator: PC EYE
Shelf locator: PC EYE 1939
Topics
Nazi propaganda
Poland -- History -- Occupation, 1939-1945
Military officers -- Russian -- 1900-1999
Document signings
War allies
Military officers -- German -- 1939-1945
Genres
Photographs
Notes
Content: Picture caption: "Der Einmarsch der roten Armee in die ukainischen und weißrussichen Gebiete in Polen ist für England und seine Verbündeten eine sehr unangenehme Ueberraschung und veranlaszt das britische Lügenministerium wuterfüllten Kommentaren. Unser Bild zeigt einen deutschen Armeeführer und russische Offiziere in der [ehe]maligen Wojwodschaft von Bialystok während der Besprechungen über die Besetzung bis zur vereinba[ren] Demarkationslinie."
Content: As a secret part of the Russian-German non-aggression pact, the two countries agreed to divide Poland between them. On September 17, 1939, Russia invaded Poland under the pretext of protecting her interests there from wartime chaos.
Content: Title translates German picture caption
Source note: Grossdeutschland im Weltgeschehen. Tagesbildberichte 1940. (Berlin Joh. Kasper Co. 1942) Braeckow, Ernst, Author.
Physical Description
Gelatin silver prints
Type of Resource
Still image
Identifiers
Universal Unique Identifier (UUID): 9d11a640-c601-012f-725a-58d385a7bc34
Rights Statement
The copyright and related rights status of this item has been reviewed by The New York Public Library, but we were unable to make a conclusive determination as to the copyright status of the item. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use.

Item timeline of events

  • 1885: Creator Born
  • 1939: Issued
  • 1957: Creator Died
  • 2017: Digitized
  • 2019: Found by you!
  • 2020

MLA Format

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "The entry of the Red Army into the Ukrainian and White Russian districts of Poland gave England and her allies an unpleasant surprise and left her "Ministry of Lies" unable to do anything but issue angry statements. Our picture shows a German army commander with Russian officers in the former Voivodeschaft (district) of Bialystok during discussions concerning the placement of the agreed (German-Russian) demarcation line." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1939. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/b0764cf4-fc95-0cb7-e040-e00a18067af7

Chicago/Turabian Format

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "The entry of the Red Army into the Ukrainian and White Russian districts of Poland gave England and her allies an unpleasant surprise and left her "Ministry of Lies" unable to do anything but issue angry statements. Our picture shows a German army commander with Russian officers in the former Voivodeschaft (district) of Bialystok during discussions concerning the placement of the agreed (German-Russian) demarcation line." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed September 16, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/b0764cf4-fc95-0cb7-e040-e00a18067af7

APA Format

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. (1939). The entry of the Red Army into the Ukrainian and White Russian districts of Poland gave England and her allies an unpleasant surprise and left her "Ministry of Lies" unable to do anything but issue angry statements. Our picture shows a German army commander with Russian officers in the former Voivodeschaft (district) of Bialystok during discussions concerning the placement of the agreed (German-Russian) demarcation line. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/b0764cf4-fc95-0cb7-e040-e00a18067af7

Wikipedia Citation

<ref name=NYPL>{{cite web | url=http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/b0764cf4-fc95-0cb7-e040-e00a18067af7 | title= (still image) The entry of the Red Army into the Ukrainian and White Russian districts of Poland gave England and her allies an unpleasant surprise and left her "Ministry of Lies" unable to do anything but issue angry statements. Our picture shows a German army commander with Russian officers in the former Voivodeschaft (district) of Bialystok during discussions concerning the placement of the agreed (German-Russian) demarcation line., (1939) }} |author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=September 16, 2019 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox, and Tilden Foundation}}</ref>

The entry of the Red Army into the Ukrainian and White Russian districts of Poland gave England and her allies an unpleasant surprise and left her "Ministry of Lies" unable to do anything but issue angry statements.  Our picture shows a German army commander with Russian officers in the former Voivodeschaft (district) of Bialystok during discussions concerning the placement of the agreed (German-Russian) demarcation line.