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Nyulemai Cham, Korphu Drup: Day Two [Close shot]

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Nyulemai Cham, Korphu Drup: Day Two [Close shot]

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Title
Nyulemai Cham, Korphu Drup: Day Two [Close shot]
Additional title: Dance of the Evil Spirit
Names
Core of Culture (Organization) (Producer)
Core of Culture (Organization) (Donor)
Collection

Bhutan Dance Project, Core of Culture

Dates / Origin
Date Created: 2007
Library locations
Jerome Robbins Dance Division
Shelf locator: *MGZIDF 993B
Topics
Dance -- Bhutan
Folk dancing -- Bhutan
Dance -- Religious aspects -- Buddhism
Rites & ceremonies -- Bhutan
Masks -- Bhutan
Spirits (Buddhism)
Buddhist demonology -- Bhutan
Dzongs -- Bhutan -- Trongsa (District)
Trongsa (Bhutan : District)
Festivals -- Bhutan
Ritual and ceremonial dancing -- Bhutan
Mask dances -- Bhutan
Genres
Filmed dance
Filmed performances
Notes
Additional physical form: For wide shot version, see: *MGZIDF 993A.
Content: Program of the Korphu Drup: Day Two (Jan. 4, 2007): Atsara Cham - Dance of the Atsaras ; Zheng Zhi Pem - Ritual for Longevity ; Shinjey Yab Yum - Dance of the Lord of Death and his Consort ; Sangay Lingpai Nga Cham - The Drum Dance of Sangay Lingpa ; Nyulemai Cham - The Dance of the Evil Spirit ; Chungzhi (Chung Zam) - Dance of the Four Garudas ; Nyulemai Cham (Part II) - The Dance of the Evil Spirit ; Peling Chagtshel - The Line Dance of the Peling Tradition ; Zhanag Nga Cham - Dance of the Black Hats with Drums.
Venue: Videotaped in performance at the Korphu Lakhang, in Trongsa, Bhutan (courtyard level in front of the Lhakang looking along the left diagonal), on Jan. 4, 2007.
Acquisition: Gift; Core of Culture. NN-PD
Physical Description
Born digital
Extent: 1 video file (ca. 10 min.) : sound, color
Description
The Dance of the Nyulema - or Evil Spirit. In this version the nyulema appears several times during the day, before he is captured by the Chungzhi (Four Garudas) (avenging punishers of Evil) who punish him. In this dramatic performance the Evil spirit first tries to win the crowd over to his evil ways - and is ably supported in his antics by the attendant atsaras. This clip shows the Nyulema s first dance up until the moment he leaves the arena before the Chungzhi arrive. The Nyulema is an Evil spirit and this extended dance dramatises both his methods of creating mischief and his ultimate discovery and capture by the avenging spirits sent to punish those who transgress. At first the nyulema dances together with the atsaras, who act as willing accomplices, and interpret his actions to the crowd. His chief goal is to win the spectators over to his evil ways. The nyulema represents something present in every human being: the three poisons (Doksum (dok = poison) and (sum = three)) of Anger, Greed and Ignorance. He plays to the crowd of spectators on each of the four sides of the arena, promising to give them whatever they want - and feigning to give them food and drink in order to win them over. Eventually, he builds a fence around them to fence them in, since he wishes to make them all part of his retinue. Finally he lies down in the middle of the ground - happy at all the mischief he has done and all the souls he has won over to help him. In this particular version of Korphu, the avengers are Four Garudas (Chungzhi) and their hounds. After the arrival of the Garudas the nyulema appears to sicken - and in a compassionate and humorous second scene - a pawo (a doctor who treats his patients through rituals) is called in to help. Much of the humor of this part relates to the fact that the pawo doesn t speak the same language as the patient and the atsara who are trying to help with translation. What follows next is a fine travesty of a healing ritual. The chief atsara in these scenes is named Ap Dawa Drakpa - and he is a very fine performer, amusing the crowds with his sharp wits. He claims that he was given this name in a dream in which he was told that he needed a name in order to be better known for his performances - the name given in the dream became the only one he uses. In real life he is a quiet and unassuming fellow - but all that changes when he dons the atsara mask and holds forth on stage.Korphu Drup begins the evening of Jan. 3, 2007 with a religious ceremony held in front of the Lhakhang followed by a Mewang, the burning of a large gate that everyone is invited to pass beneath whilst it's still burning. Various ging dances are also performed during the mewang.
Type of Resource
Moving image
Identifiers
NYPL catalog ID (B-number): b19944606
Universal Unique Identifier (UUID): b4e40c90-0821-0131-dcb9-3c075448cc4b
Copyright Notice
Core of Culture
Rights Statement
This item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

Item timeline of events

  • 2007: Created
  • 2013: Digitized
  • 2020: Found by you!
  • 2021

MLA Format

Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library. "Nyulemai Cham" The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 2007. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/ea42aed0-0381-0131-fa8b-3c075448cc4b

Chicago/Turabian Format

Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library. "Nyulemai Cham" New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed April 2, 2020. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/ea42aed0-0381-0131-fa8b-3c075448cc4b

APA Format

Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library. (2007). Nyulemai Cham Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/ea42aed0-0381-0131-fa8b-3c075448cc4b

Wikipedia Citation

<ref name=NYPL>{{cite web | url=http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/ea42aed0-0381-0131-fa8b-3c075448cc4b | title= (moving image) Nyulemai Cham, (2007)|author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=April 2, 2020 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox, and Tilden Foundations}}</ref>

Nyulemai Cham