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[The thirty-seven nats] 3. Hnamádawgyí nat. 4. Shwe Nabé nat.

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Names
Temple, Richard Carnac, Sir, 1850-1931 (Writer of accompanying material)
Griggs, William, 1832-1911 (Printer of plates)
Collection

thirty-seven nats, a phase of spirit-worship prevailing in Burma, by Sir R. C. Temple. With full-page and other illustrations.

Dates / Origin
Date Issued: 1906
Place Term: London
Publisher: W. Griggs, chromo-lithographer to the king.
Library locations
General Research Division
Shelf locator: *OY+ (Temple, R.C. Thirty-seven nats) (Locked Cage)
Topics
Religion -- Burma
Elephants -- Burma
Genres
Illustrations
Notes
Content: No. 3. Hnamádawgyí Nat, also known as Shwé Myet-hná Nat, or Golden-cheeks, and Taung-gyí Shin Nat. When Mà Sawmè, as Queen Thíriwundá, heard that her brother was being burnt in the jasmine tree, she rushed into the fire, and all the king could save of her was her head. After death, she and her brother lived in the jasmine (michelia champaca) as Nats at Tagaung, where they did much harm to the people. So the king had the tree felled and thrown into the river. It floated down to Pagán, where it grounded near the Kuppayawgá Gate. It was taken out of the river by Thalakhyaung Min (i.e., Thinlígyaung-ngè of Pagán, 520-529 A.D.), who took it to the Pópá Mountain, where I [Temple R.C.] am assured that their heads in gold are still to be seen. Their festival is in December. This Nat is represented as a woman, standing in Court dress of a high class, sometimes with a nagá (serpent) head-dress, supported by a balú on a kneelling or standing elephant. [p. 45-46] No. 4. Shwe Nabé Nat. She was born at Mindón and was the daughter of the Sea-serpent (Yénagá). She went to worship at a footprint of Gaudama (Buddha) in the form of a woman. Here she met Nga Tindè, while he was hiding in the jungle, and became his wife. They had two sons, Taungmagyí and Myauk Minshinbyú. She died of grief at her husband's failure to return to her after he had started to visit his sister at Tahaung. This Nat is represented as a girl standing on a lotus throne, in Court dress of a high class, with a nagá head-dress. [p. 46]
Physical Description
Form: Chromolithographs ( Library of Congress Thesaurus for Graphic Materials )
Extent: Two images on one 37.5 x 26.5 cm page. (Coloured)
Type of Resource
Still image
Identifiers
NYPL catalog ID (B-number) : b11610752
UUID: 8b47c100-c6df-012f-27f1-3c075448cc4b

Item timeline of events

  • 1850: Creator Born
  • 1906: Issued
  • 1931: Creator Died
  • 2014: Digitized
  • 2015: Found by you!
  • 2016

MLA Format

General Research Division, The New York Public Library. "[The thirty-seven nats] 3. Hnamádawgyí nat. 4. Shwe Nabé nat." The New York Public Library Digital Collections. 1906. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-a893-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Chicago/Turabian Format

General Research Division, The New York Public Library. "[The thirty-seven nats] 3. Hnamádawgyí nat. 4. Shwe Nabé nat." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed September 1, 2015. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-a893-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

APA Format

General Research Division, The New York Public Library. (1906). [The thirty-seven nats] 3. Hnamádawgyí nat. 4. Shwe Nabé nat. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-a893-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

Wikipedia Citation

<ref name=NYPL>{{cite web | url=http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-a893-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99 | title= (still image) [The thirty-seven nats] 3. Hnamádawgyí nat. 4. Shwe Nabé nat., (1906) }} |author=Digital Collections, The New York Public Library |accessdate=September 1, 2015 |publisher=The New York Public Library, Astor, Lennox, and Tilden Foundation}}</ref>

[The thirty-seven nats] 3. Hnamádawgyí nat. 4. Shwe Nabé nat.